Radioactive dating examples in present day

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Far from being data, these dates are actually interpretations of the data.As discussed before, the assumptions influence the interpretation of the data.You would need to have access to scientific instruments at this point that could measure the amount of radioactivity in the sample, so off to the lab we go!After you prepare your sample and put it into the machine, your readout says you have approximately 75% Nitrogen-14 and 25% Carbon-14.This technique relies on the property of half-life.Half-life is defined as the time it takes for one-half of a radioactive element to decay into a daughter isotope.Now it is time to put those math skills to good use.At one half-life, you would have approximately 50% Carbon-14 and 50% Nitrogen-14.

By measuring the ratio of the amount of the original radioactive element to the daughter isotope, scientists can determine how many half-lives the element has undergone and from there can figure out the absolute age of the sample.

There are three main assumptions that must be made to accept radiometric dating methods.

These must be accepted on faith in uniformitarian and naturalistic frameworks.

The half-lives of several radioactive isotopes are known and are used often to figure out the age of newly found fossils.

Different isotopes have different half-lives and sometimes more than one present isotope can be used to get an even more specific age of a fossil.

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