1950s and dating

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“The date usually happened in a public place, among other teens; there was lots of talking to get to know each other; and if there was any money spent, they guy paid,” Chatel noted. In a 1959 poll, nearly three-quarters of high-school students supported the idea of dating only one person at a time, i.e.“going steady.” To show you were committed, the male significant other would usually give his female counterpart a ring or pin, which was called “getting pinned.” reported in 1957, “Boys and girls who go steady dance together exclusively (cutting in is frowned upon), sip their sodas, absorb their double features and spin their platters in each other’s company or not at all.“The marriage prescriptions of the 1950s could be summed up in one sentence: It was mainly a woman’s job to foster a happy marriage and steer it away from divorce.”“Rather than a step toward marriage, going steady became an important coming-of-age ritual in itself.” As we previously discussed in 7 Characteristics of Going Steady, the 1950s marked a shift in dating culture.Whereas a competitive dating system dominated the 1930s as we previously mentioned, ’50s youth opted to date one person.In the 1950s, “first dates often happened after the guy called the girl on the phone,” relationships writer Amanda Chatel explained on Mic.The idea of the perfect first date has changed a lot in 50 years.

Back then, rules like “never drop your silverware on a first date” weren’t seen as overly strict — they were just the norm.

It was the birthed children, modern psychology, and even rock and roll.

about the 1950s—midcentury furniture design and the period’s full-skirted, ladylike fashions, for example. The comically cringe-worthy dating culture and the way women were instructed to behave in order to attract a partner.

In some sense, it mirrored the marriage craze of the time.

“Going steady had become a sort of play-marriage, a mimicry of the actual marriage of their slightly older peers,” wrote Beth Bailey.

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